Researcher, Producer, Organizer

About

Hey there, my name’s Chris.

I tell stories that uncover emerging futures and make complexity legible within the place now called Canada.

 

As an documentary producer,

I produce sound-rich stories from intimate, unsteady
moments—as everyday people go off-script from the cultures that ensnare them.

After all, culture is a story.

As a writer & editor,

I develop and curate content—narrative, data-driven, deep-dive—that moves hearts, minds & hands towards connection, engagement and play.

After all, branding is a story.

As a researcher and designer, 

I facilitate collaborative learning experiences that contextualize local insights into actionable programs, products, and services.

After all, knowledge is a story.

 
 
Photo credit: Fatin Chowdhury. www.fatinchowdhury.ca

Photo credit: Fatin Chowdhury. www.fatinchowdhury.ca

 
 
 

Over the past 10 years, I’ve called my career by many names: from policy analysis
and community organizing, to qualitative research and storytelling.

 

Stories & Culture Change.

I’ve got the deep experience in complexity to translate insights & experiences into content that will move your audience’s hearts, minds & hands to action.

Content & Curation.

I’ve got the editorial and branding instincts to identify the right context at the right time for the right audience to understand the right message.

Methods & Presence.

I’ve got the methodological and facilitation chops to orchestrate responsive research, sense-making and strategy that keeps your work relevant and inclusive.

 
 

 
 

Ah yes, and as a human,

I’ve spent time as a cooperative housing manager, a compulsive essayist and live storyteller, a hapless meditator, a relentless hobbyist (currently: boxing), .

And in the footsteps Nanny Isobel and Grampy Bert, I like to think I can hold court as a gracious dinner guest and a warm-hearted oddball, respectively.

 
 

 
 

Territorial acknowledgement

Since 2012, I have called my home Tkaronto/Toronto in One Dish One Spoon treaty territory since 2012, with strong roots remaining in the Kennebecasis Valley of Southern New Brunswick, the traditional and unceded land of the Wolastoqiyik.